OceanAdapt: Open Data for an Ocean on the Move

Roger B. Griffis (1), Malin Pinsky (2), Jon Hare (3), Ryan D. Batt (4), James W. Morley (5)

1 NOAA Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology, 1315 East West Hywy, Silver Spring, MD, USA 20910, roger.b.griffis@noaa.gov, https://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/ecosystems/climate/

2 NOAA Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, 28 Tarzwell Drive, Narragansett, RI 02882, jon.hare@noaa.gov,
http://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/epd/ocean/MainPage/

3 Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Rd., New Brunswick, NJ, USA 08901, malin.pinsky@rutgers.edu, http://pinsky.marine.rutgers.edu

4 Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Rd., New Brunswick, NJ, USA 08901, battrd@gmail.com, http://pinsky.marine.rutgers.edu

5 Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Rd., New Brunswick, NJ, USA 08901, jw.morley@rutgers.edu, http://pinsky.marine.rutgers.edu

By 2100, ocean waters are expected to be substantially warmer than they are today, with profound effects on fisheries. One of the most commonly observed impacts of climate change is through shifts in species distributions, and recent evidence suggests that marine fish and invertebrates closely follow climate velocity (the rate and direction that isotherms move across the seascape). Despite broad recognition of impacts, however, incorporating climate considerations into fisheries management has been challenging. Here, we describe a new web-based tool that can help managers, scientists, fishermen, and the public track shifts in the distribution of marine fish and other animals in the United States. The OceanAdapt website (http://oceanadapt.rutgers.edu) is the result of a partnership between NOAA Fisheries Service and Rutgers University that annually aggregates a variety of marine biological survey data and provides information on species distributions for easy use by multiple audiences. The effort is part of the growing trend towards open science and can help in the preparation of climate vulnerability analyses or in the prioritization of species for more focused adaptation efforts.

Species on the Move

If you would like more information about the outcomes of Species on the Move 2016 or plans for the next Species on the Move Conference please contact Associate Gretta Pecl.

The next conference is likely to be in 2019 at Kruger National Park in South Africa.

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